Day-By-Day

(**Subject to change at discretion of instructor)

WEEK IINTRODUCTION

Jan. 20: Review syllabus. Introductions and begin Overview/Goals of semester.

Twitter Assignment #1: Watch the State of the Union (start time, 9 p.m.) and file at least eight tweets to #umassjournalism.

Assignment: Set up the following accounts by the start of next class:

* A gmail account (you can forward your UMass e-mail to gmail; once you set up your gmail, send me your address so I can send you a Google Plus invite);

* A delicious account;

* A Twitter account using Tweetdeck (or another tool) and a Storify account;

* A Flickr account;

* A vimeo or YouTube account;

* AND: Start designing your blog, using either Blogger or WordPress.  First steps:  A professional name and design.

READINGS:

* Briggs, Introduction, Ch.1.

* McAdams, Ch. 1-2

* “Tips for Writing for the Web,” Mindy McAdams.

* “Here’s what journalists miss when they don’t leave the office,” Poynter

*  “10 Key Skills for Digital Journalists to Hone in 2014,” Rachel Bartlett.

Jan. 22: Finish Overview/Goals of semester.   DISCUSSION: A brief look at the history of online journalism.  Analyze some of the general concepts behind Web journalism. Blogs, Wikis, RSS feeds, Twitter.  Delivery is changing but is it journalism? Everyone will set up Twitter/Storify accounts in class. 

Outside Assignment #1:  Write a one-page memo on how you see multimedia journalism influencing the future of the profession. DEADLINE: Start of next class.

WEEK 2:  BLOGS & WRITING FOR THE WEB, PART I

Jan. 27:   Web Links Discussion:  Every Tuesday we will spend the first 20 minutes or so of class talking about what’s new on the Web, including what you’ve seen or heard or have found interest in.

DISCUSSION: Blogs.  Are they journalism or something else? We’ll discuss the difference between ‘professional’ and ‘independent’ blogs and talk about what makes for a good news blog. “Informed analysis.” What does that mean?

LAB: We’ll spend class time working on designing, constructing and launching your blogs.

* ASSIGNMENT: Register for the following news sites (if you haven’t already): boston.com; nytimes.com; washingtonpost.com; bbc.com.  ALSO:  Search for the following people on your Twitter Feed and follow them:  Mindy McAdams, Jeff Jarvis, Jay Rosen, Maureen Dowd, Lisa Williams, Kara Swisher, Clay Shirky, Tom Kennedy.

READINGS:

* Briggs, Ch. 2.

*  McAdams, Ch. 3-4.

* “5 Tips for Blog Beginners” & WordPress Basics,” Mindy McAdams.

* “Blog Like a Journalist,” Dan Kennedy

*  “Why Blog?  A Guide for Students,” Steve Fox

Jan. 29:   BLOG WORKSHOP:  By the end of class, you will have your blog up and running. You’ll be filling out your ‘About’ page; adding at least 5 links to your blog roll; creating a readable design and adding three ‘features’ on it, including your Twitter feed. Finally, your first blog post:  A ‘welcome’ entry.

TWITTER ASSIGNMENT #3: Please file 8-10 tweets on the postgame celebration on campus Sunday night. Use the hashtag #umassjournalism. Do no put yourself in danger. DEADLINE: Midnight, Sunday.

Outside Assignment #2:  Blog Entry (300-500 words.) Please take your tweets and the coverage of Sunday’s post-game event and create a blog entry. DUE DATE: Please post your blog entry to your blog by Monday, 5 p.m. E-mail me your blog link at that time.

WEEK 3: BLOGS & WEB JOURNALISM, PART II

 Feb. 2: Last day to Add or Drop with no record

Feb. 3: Web Links Discussion:  What’s New on the Web?

BLOG REVIEW:  We’ll have instructor review/editing and peer review/editing on your blog’s design and on your first blog entry. We’ll have time for revisions/edits to your blog entry. DUE DATE: Revisions due to your blog by 7 p.m.

DISCUSSION: “American-Made Benny

Web Journalism:  A brief look at design of Web sites and how Web newsrooms run.  How is news presented on the Web? How do you develop a news package?  What rules do Web journalists follow?  

Questions to consider: What does a Web newsroom look like? What elements make for a good news Web site? How are Web sites changing? How do news Web sites handle breaking news/features/projects? What about the role of advertisements? Blogs? Audio? Video? Slideshows?

READINGS:

*  Briggs, ch. 4.

*  McAdams, ch. 5-6.

*  “Twitter Tips for Journalists,” Steve Buttry

* “How to Use Social Media Ethically,” EducationShift

*  “The Updated Guide to Storify for Journalists,” Kelly Fincham

Feb. 5: SOCIAL MEDIA WORKSHOP:  How and when do we use Twitter?  What are the rules?  How do we handle Facebook as journalists?  How do we balance the personal/professional divide in social media?  We’ll go through some exercises on how to Tweet and what you should do to maintain a professional digital profile. Don’t forget: Fox’s Rules of Social Media.

TWITTER ASSIGNMENT #4:  Twitter Scavenger Hunt

OUTSIDE ASSIGNMENT #3:   Write a 300-500 blog entry on a topic in the news (with three links.) DEADLINE: Post to your blog by Sunday, 5 p.m.  E-mail me your blog link at that time.

 

WEEK 4: SOCIAL MEDIA & AUDIO SLIDESHOWS

Feb. 10: Web Links Discussion:  What’s New on the Web?

BLOG REVIEW:  We’ll have instructor review/editing and peer review/editing on your blog’s design and on your first blog entry. We’ll have time for revisions/edits to your blog entry. DUE DATE: Revisions due to your blog by 7 p.m.

Social Media Discussion, continued.  How do you use Twitter and Facebook as a reporting tool?  We’ll look at the work of Nick Kristoff of The New York Times and NPR’s Andy Carvin — if you’re not following them, you should be. Also, we’ll look at Storify as a storytelling tool.

DISCUSSION: One in 8 Million: New York Characters in Sound and Images,”  New York Times

TWITTER ASSIGNMENT #5:  File 5-6 tweets about sound between today and our next class. What do you hear? Take note of what you’re hearing and how and where you’re hearing things.

READINGS:

* Briggs, Ch. 6, 7.

* McAdams, Ch. 7-11

* “If a tweet worked once, send it again — and other lessons from The New York Times’ social media desk,” Nieman Lab.

* “How Facebook Is Changing the Way Its Users Consume Journalism,” New York Times.

* “Sound in the Story: Balancing the Tools in New-Media Journalism” (PDF)  Download and read.

Feb. 12: STORIFY: We’ll spend some class time storifying your second twitter assignment.

Video Workshop:  We will break out the videocams and get comfortable with the equipment and start shooting!

The Basics of shooting. The rules of the Rhodes (Chet Rhodes, multimedia editor at The Washington Post) and other guidelines/tricks to shooting.  Storyboarding. What makes for good video? Editing. Basic cuts.

Also, we will divide up into teams of two for our first team video assignment of the semester.  Teammates will interview each other for a short (45-60 seconds) mini-profile.  No more than 3 questions focusing on why your partner got into journalism and how they see the future of journalism. You should let your partner know what the questions are and leave your interviewing voice out. Points to focus on for this assignment: Rule of thirds; framing; background; sound.

 

NOTE:  If you haven’t worked with an audio recorder or audio editing software, check out one of the many audio tutorials available on the Web.

OUTSIDE ASSIGNMENT #4: Please read and watch the video on this New York Times story: “For More Pianos, Last Note Is Thud in the Dump.”  Write a 300-500 word blog entry about the story.  Was the video effective?  Why? Why not? Was the package effective?  Why? Why not? DEADLINE: Post to your blog by Sunday, 5 p.m.  E-mail me your blog link at that time.

VIDEO TEAM ASSIGNMENT #1: Teammate interviews. FINAL DEADLINE: Posted to your blogs by the end of class on Feb. 26. ROUGH CUT DEADLINE: Please shoot your initial interviews before the start of next class. We’ll review your shots and see if they are good enough to post, if not you can spend class time re-shooting.

WEEK 5:  INTRODUCTION TO VIDEO

Feb. 16:  Holiday — President’s Day

Feb. 17: No Class: Monday Schedule.

READINGS:

* Briggs, ch. 8.

*  Premiere Tutorials: 10 Things |Video Editing Basics | Beginners Tutorial

*  “J Cuts and L Cuts,” Al Tompkins

*  “A Line-by-Line Story Deconstruction,” Al Tompkins

Feb. 19: DISCUSSION:  “The Sky Cowboys” | * “An Ambush and a Comrade Lost.

Video Editing: An Introduction to Premiere. (We’ll do a quick review of tutorials.  You should have your pieces shot and ready for editing at the start of class.)

DEADLINE: Move deadline to end of class on Feb. 24?

OUTSIDE ASSIGNMENT #5: Please write a 300-500 word blog entry about The Sky Cowboys.”  Was the piece effective?  Why? Why not?  DEADLINE: Post to your blog by Sunday, 5 p.m.  E-mail me your blog link at that time.

WEEK 6:  SHOOTING & EDITING VIDEO

Feb. 24: DISCUSSION: Bethany’s Favorite Videos

Lab If needed, work on finishing Project #1. Your projects should be uploaded to Vimeo or YouTube by the end of class.

 DEADLINE: Post to your blogs by the end of class.

READINGS:

*  Ch. 12-15 in McAdams.

* “The Five-Shot Method for Shooting Video.”

*  “The Evolution of Video Storytelling,” PBS MediaShift

*  “The Web Video Problem,” Adam Westbrook.

Feb. 26:   VIDEO #1 CRITIQUES: We will spend the first part of class going through and critiquing (friendly critique) your video projects.  Each team should be ready to do a short presentation on their project. Students will spend class critiquing and offering input each other’s projects. We will then spend some class time storyboarding for your next video project.

VIDEO TEAM ASSIGNMENT #2:  Person on the Street Q&A.  Pick a question to ask UMass students and faculty.  Go out and ask the question.  Answers should ideally be 15-30 seconds, no longer than a minute.  Each member of the team shoots 2 people answering a question. Your final edited version should be 1 1/2-2 minutes. Also required: A 500-word blog entry.  If time, we will start storyboarding in class.

Points to focus on for this assignment: Solid b-roll; shooting sequences; smooth transitions; a beginning, middle, end.  ALSO: Rule of thirds; framing; background; sound; blog entry. DEADLINE: Posted to your blogs by 5 p.m. on March 6.

ASSIGNMENT: E-mail me the question you will be asking by 9 p.m. I will approve, offer input. Shoot interviews and b-roll by the start of next class.

WEEK 7:  SHOOTING & EDITING Q&A PROJECT

March 3: WORKSHOP: We’ll review your rough cuts and see if you’re question is working. If “yes,” you can spend class time editing. Otherwise, you’ll have to re-shoot and find a new question. 

ASSIGNMENT:  Shoot interviews for your project.

READINGS:

*  Ch. 10 in Briggs.

* “Making a ‘Good’ Newspaper Video, NAA

March 5: Last day to Drop With a ‘W’

March 5EDITINGWe will spend class time editing your Q&A projects. All videos should be uploaded to Vimeo or YouTube and your class blog  by 5 p.m. on March 6.

Twitter Assignment #3:  Please tweet the Blarney Blowout — your Saturday, March 7. No matter where you are, tweet — 5-8 tweets by the end of the day. Pics are welcome, quotes (responsible quotes) are welcome. Remember, no TWI (Tweeting While Intoxicated.) Please use the #umassjournalism hashtag.

 

WEEK 8: CRITIQUES/REVIEWS

March 10: VIDEO #2 CRITIQUES:  Students will spend class critiquing and offering input each other’s projects. We will then spend some class time with my own evaluations and grading of the project.

If time, we will start storyboarding: VIDEO TEAM ASSIGNMENT #3:  Feature. Teams will produce a short video on a feature story of their choosing with an accompanying blog entry.  The video should be 2-4 minutes in length and the blog entry should be 500-700 words.  Get 2-3 good interviews for each.

DEADLINE:  Post to your blog by the end of class on April 7.  You should shoot b-roll and interviews prior to the start of next class.

Readings:

*  “The Social Media Wire Is Spreading Across Digital First,” Digital First Media

* “Pentagon Cites Weapons Found at Scene of Killings in Iraq Video,” NPR

* “Is it ever Ok to Unpublish a Story?” The Washington Post.

March 12VIDEO #3 WORKSHOP:  Discuss/storyboard story ideas; research; develop shot list and interview list.

BLOG ASSIGNMENT #5: Write a 300-500 blog entry on Gun Country, The New York Times.  Feel free to bring in other readings/videos as well. DEADLINE: Post to your blog by Sunday, March 22 at 5 p.m.  E-mail me your blog link at that time.

WEEK 9: MARCH 14-22: SPRING BREAK!

WEEK 10:    SHOOTING & EDITING FEATURES

March 24: Workshop:  Discuss/storyboard story ideas; research; develop shot list and interview list. I want a storyboard by the end of class.

Twitter Assignment #4:  Listen to the first episode of Serial on Wednesday at 9 p.m. Have a conversation during and after about the story as well as the journalism behind the story. Listen carefully to the reporter and her use of voice. File your tweets with the #umassjournalism hashtag.

DEADLINE:  Start of next class.

READINGS:

*  ch. 9 in Briggs

* “Grammar of the Edit,”  Ch. 7-8.

* “Top 10 Tech Trends That Every Journalist Should Know, Amy Webb

* Tracking Breaking News on Twitter, Nieman Lab

March 26: LAB: Shoot and edit video for Video Project #3.

TWITTER ASSIGNMENT #5: Listen to episode 2 & 3 of Serial on Monday at 9 p.m. Have a conversation during and after about the story as well as the journalism behind the story. Listen carefully to the reporter and her use of voice. File your tweets with the #umassjournalism hashtag.

WEEK 11:    SHOOTING & EDITING FEATURES

March 31:  WORKSHOP:  Shoot/edit Feature packages. Review rough cuts/blog drafts.

DEADLINE:  Post to your blog by the end of class on April 7.

TWITTER ASSIGNMENT #6: Listen to episode 4 of Serial on Wednesday at 9. Have a conversation during and after about the story as well as the journalism behind the story. Listen carefully to the reporter and her use of voice. File your tweets with the #umassjournalism hashtag.

READINGS:

* “Grammar of the Edit,”  Ch. 7-8.

* “Top 10 Tech Trends That Every Journalist Should Know, Amy Webb

* Tracking Breaking News on Twitter, Nieman Lab

April 2: GUEST SPEAKERS: The Gazette’s Rebecca Everett is scheduled to talk about covering the UMass gang rape trial during class time in the Journalism Hub. Rebecca has been live-tweeting the trial and will talk about the challenges she has faced.

OUT-OF-CLASS ASSIGNMENT: Edit your feature packages. Review rough cuts/blog drafts.

Final versions of video and blog posts due on your blogs by the end of class Thursday.

TWITTER ASSIGNMENT #7: Listen to episode 5 of Serial on Monday at 7. Have a conversation during and after about the story as well as the journalism behind the story. Listen carefully to the reporter and her use of voice. File your tweets with the #umassjournalism hashtag.

 

WEEK 12FINAL PROJECT: STORYBOARD

April 7: Workshop:  Shooting/Editing.

BLOG ASSIGNMENT #6: Analyze/comment on the presentation given by Rebecca Everett and Laurie Loisel. DEADLINE: Start of class Thursday.

READINGS:

*  “How to handle plagiarism and fabrication allegations,” Poynter

* “Steve Jobs Had No Heart Attack…And Citizen Journalism Just Failed,” Read, Write, Web

* “The Battle of Wanat,” The Washington Post.

VIDEO ASSIGNMENT #4:  FINAL TEAM PROJECT (30 percent of your grade).

The final video piece will be a team project focusing on an issue in the news and should be 3-5 minutes long and each blog entry should be 500-1,000 words. I’m looking for a more of a news feature/news analysis type of approach here with the video. Each team member will be required to write a separate blog entry that will be a piece of the package. Remember, you want your blog entries to complement your video. Additionally, I want each team to research Twitter and find relevant discussions to their issue and provide a storify of recent tweets on the topic.

STORYBOARD: A storyboard (I will provide you with a template to fill out) of your story idea is due by the start of class on April 14The storyboard will make up 10 percent of your grade for the project.

FIRST DRAFT:  How/when you collect your video is up to you.  We will review the first drafts of blog entries and rough cuts on April 16. The first drafts will make up 10 percent of your grade.

April 9: Final editing/uploading. Don’t forget to leave time to upload to Vimeo/YouTube!

 BLOG ASSIGNMENT #7:  Please write a 500-word blog entry on your thoughts about the journalism of “Serial” to date. DEADLINE: Start of class Tuesday.

TWITTER ASSIGNMENT #8: Listen to episode 6 of Serial on Sunday at 7. Have a conversation during and after about the story as well as the journalism behind the story. Listen carefully to the reporter and her use of voice. File your tweets with the #umassjournalism hashtag.

 

Week 13: FINAL PROJECT: FIRST DRAFT

April 14:  VIDEO #2 CRITIQUES: We will spend the first part of class going through and critiquing (friendly critique) your video projects. We will then spend some class time reviewing storyboards/researching for your final project.

READINGS:

* NPR, Reuters, CNN and other major news orgs incorrectly declare death of Rep. Giffords, Regret The Error

* “One-Sided CBS Report Paints Palin as Responsible for Giffords Shooting,” NewsBusters

*  “NPR introduces new Ethics Handbook,” Poynter

April 16: Workshop: Shooting/reporting.

BLOG ASSIGNMENT #8: In a 500-word blog entry please examine the ethics behind removing stories from the Web.  DEADLINE:  Due by start of next class.

 

Week 14:  FINAL PROJECT: REVISE FIRST DRAFTS

April 21:   Workshop: Review rough cuts of videos and blog entries.

ASSIGNMENT:  By Noon Wednesday, e-mail me a one-page memo outlining  where your team headed with your Final Project (ie: how many interviews completed; dates interviews scheduled for; b-roll shot and needed to shoot, etc.)

BLOG ASSIGNMENT #9: Write a 300-500 word blog entry analyzing some of the ethical implications of SEO. DEADLINE:  Start of next class.

READINGS:

SEO for Journalists

*  “SEO Makes It Too Late for Truth for ‘Ground Zero Mosque,'” Kelly McBride.

* “USAT:  It’s About Time for the Next Re-Invention,” Newsonomics.

April 23Workshop: Editing for your Final Project.

BLOG ASSIGNMENT #10: A Look to The Future: Write a 300-500 word blog entry on the future of journalism.  Look back on what you wrote at the start of the semester, think about what you’ve done and read this semester and examine whether your perspective has changed and why. DEADLINE:  Start of next class.

Week 15:  THE END

April 28:   Workshop: Editing for your Final Project.

READINGS:

* “When Will a Web Editor Lead a Major Newsroom,” Editor & Publisher

* “Solutions for Journalism, or Re-Creating the Priesthood?” Dan Gillmor

Web Site Starts From a Memo, Gains Millions of Readers, Steve Fox

* “The Demise of Newspapers Means Better Journalism,” Jim Stovall

* “The All-Digital Newsroom of the Future,” Steve Outing

*  “Yes, Virginia, the Web has Changed the Way Newspapers Operate,” Steve Fox

 


May 7: FINAL PROJECTS DUE ON YOUR BLOGS by 1 p.m.

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One Response to Day-By-Day

  1. Pingback: Guest Speaker: Will McGuinness « Melissa Gately's Multimedia Blog

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